Sterling Heights, Michigan, is home to the GM Heritage Center, which houses the GM Heritage Collection. At any given time, the 81,000 square foot facility has around two hundred vehicles on display. That represents only about one third of all vehicles in the Collection.

The Heritage Center is not open to the public like a museum; however, group tours (with a minimum of 30 people) and events can be scheduled in their facility. Once in, any Bowtie enthusiast will quickly lapse into overstimulation, as these photos from supercars.net by way of amcarguide.com ably demonstrate.

While the Center doesn’t restrict its attentions to the world of Corvettes, there is ample room for a very solid history lesson in America’s Greatest Sports Car. Check out some of the examples below.

The Mako Shark II - First shown at the New York International Auto Show in 1965, Bill Mitchell's Mako Shark II previewed many C3 styling cues. The car is equally significant in being entirely free of design influence from the Harley Earl era.

1968 Chevrolet Astro II - Put together in collaboration between GM Design and GM Research, the Astro II was a future-oriented, but practical, exploration of mid-engine concepts driven by Bill MItchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov.

1986 Chevrolet Corvette Indy Concept - Evidence of a design partnership between Chevrolet engineers and the British F1 team and sportscar manufacturer Lotus is amply provided in this full scale mockup. The British company's backbone chassis was used with the engine as a fully stressed, structural member. Exotic elements within the vehicle included extensive use of carbon fiber, titanium springs, anti-lock braking and more.