Corvette VTG ET8.09@279Km/h Kiskunlachaza 22.09.2012 from VTG on Vimeo.

This last August, we observed the conditions of Europe in relation to the motoring hobby and our conclusion was that even though the Continent had an insatiable love for all things related to American performance, they simply didn’t have enough legitimate dragstrips around to be able to do anything about it.

As we noted in our August coverage of the VTG Vette from Poland, many of the places where organized drag racing takes place in Europe are actually disused airstrips, and the Kiscunlachaza Airport in Hungary is one such spot. Forget about a carefully groomed dragstrip launch pad and a spray-and-drag between rounds of competition – here, not having weeds growing through the expansion joints is about as much as you can expect.

In our featured video, VTG’s turbocharged and nitrous-injected C3 runs an amazing 8.09 second pass at Kiscunlachaza with an awe-invoking trap speed of nearly 200 miles per hour. This is of course thanks to a massive “Thumper” T106 turbo from Turbonetics force-feeding a punched-out LT1 mill that also uses a direct port wet nitrous system jetted for 600 horses from NOS.

With a solid truck frame fitted with a Syclone/Typhoon front clip, VTG's 8-second Vette sends turbocharged and nitrous-shot power to all four wheels.

Drag race conditions are a bit more primitive overseas than they are here in the States, but the Poland-based speedbuilders have remedied this by building their C3 on top of a solid truck frame with a GMC Syclone/Typhoon front clip to make the fast Vette into a permanently all-wheel-drive platform.

As if turbos and nitrous simultaneously weren’t enough to make for an amazing 8-second Vette, VTG’s LT1 motor is bored and stroked from 5.7 to 6.3 liters, proving once more that the LS series isn’t the only late-model engine family from GM that’s been enjoying radical race builds for strip and track applications over these last few years.

In fact, if you could show us an LS car today built with the hunger for horsepower and the knack for ingenuity that VTG’s C3 has been built with, then we’ll write an article just on that! The title: Whatever Happened To The Small-Blocks?!