We are given to understand that, “The corrido is a popular narrative song and poetry form, a ballad, of Mexico. The songs are often about oppression, history, daily life for peasants, and other socially important information.” Based on this description and the following video, we can infer that street racing and the timeless battle between Corvette, Viper, and Camaro are socially important information for our neighbors to the south.

Honestly, our high school Spanish is not up to the task of extracting any meaning from colloquialism-laden song lyrics, but tuba and accordion music crosses all national and cultural boundaries and the cars are nice to look at, so wait for the test pattern (and high-pitched tone) to clear, then crank up your speakers and enjoy “1) a salutation from the singer and prologue to the story; 2) the story itself; 3) a moral and farewell from the singer.”

UPDATE:

Facebook friend Aaron Leal provides the following synopsis of the plot:

“One guy is saying he has a Camaro that is notorious from the part of Mexico he is from and the other guy is saying his Viper is notorious from where he is from in Mexico so they race and the Viper wins. But then the guy with the Camaro has a back up, that being the Vette, so he says, “Come on lets go.” The other guys says, “Alright and lets put some money on it.” The Vette owner says, “Whatever you wanna put down I got it, and lets race.” They race and the Vette spanks the Viper, hence you the see the guy in the Vette doing the notorious hand motion saying that Viper didn’t have anything on him and he had no worry.”