Photos: Larry Edsall via The Detroit News

Bloomington Gold is the longest running, continuous national Corvette show and it is considered the standard by which other events are measured. Among the activities at the show are judging of cars to the standards set by the factory for that year’s production.

Survivor is one of the most coveted awards, reserved for unrestored cars that meet stringent requirements for originality. This year, one 1956 Corvette was awarded Survivor status in all four categories, despite a glaring departure from factory’s work. Just 36 cars were given Survivor status at this year’s gathering.

As reported in The Detroit News, Eduard Wallach had a special hood ornament custom made for the 1956 Corvette, on which he was trading in his 1953 model.

Wallach must have been a connected type of guy, because with only 300 Corvettes built the first year, they were only sold to GM executives, plus the movers and shakers of industry, society and entertainment.

Some years before, Wallach had bought a property, the Kishawana Country Club, at auction and converted it into the family home. Wallach maintained the Native American design influence of the property and went so far as to have the Chevrolet dealer install the ornament before delivery.

The car now resides with Steve Wallach, son of the original purchaser. The Florida resident drives the Corvette weekly, though the odometer still shows less than 34K miles on it. If there were a Bloomington Gold award for the most unusual dealer installed option, Wallach would likely have gone home with that as well.