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As always, more Corvettes than you can shake a stick at are slated to cross the blocks at the world renowned Barret-Jackson Scottsdale Collector Car Auction next month, many of them rare, original and low-mile pieces that collectors will have their eyes on. The one we’ll be tuned in to, albeit an original Corvette at its foundation, is a far cry from the way it rolled off the assembly room floor back in 1963.

Thanks to his involvements with and exploits in the early Pro Street movement, Rod Saboury remains a well-regarded figure from the last two decades of the sport, and for at least the second time in recent memory, his over-the-top ’63 Split-window Corvette is headed for auction. And this time, it will do so in prime time on Saturday, January 18th, where it will go before a worldwide collection of bidders amidst the most valuable lots in the entire Scottsdale 2014 lineup.

Images credit: Barrett-Jackson/Rod Saboury

Images credit: Barrett-Jackson/Rod Saboury

Although not Drag Week-certified (we have to get that caveat in there to satisfy the “that’s not a street car” mongers), Saboury’s familiar Corvette is one of the quickest and fastest real street cars in the world, having tripped the 1/4-mile clocks well under seven seconds at over 200 MPH (6.75 at 209 MPH in street trim, to be exact), and then driven on the street like a daily-driver to cruise nights and Sunday afternoon joyrides.

The car is a truly original ’63, featuring a chromoly double frame rail chassis built by l.owdown Hot Rods, with a Mike Moran-built 427 cubic inch small block Chevy with a pair of 88mm Garrett turbochargers, producing some 2,600 horsepower and 1,700 ft/lbs of torque. Other attributes include an MRE sheet metal intake with billet runners, Dart “Little Chief” cylinder heads, a Dart billet block, a Jesel distributor mag 44, Big Stuff 3 SEFI and traction control, a Racepak UDX digital dash and V300 computer, a nine-inch AFT triple-disc clutch, titanium bellhousing, Lenco CS2 four-speed transmission, Strange axles and disc brakes, and a lot more.

Saboury has the original VIN plate and title for the car, which has been lengthened, the hood widened, scoops added to feed into the turbos, a rear wing recessed into the body, and a whole host of aftermarket carbon fiber parts added, including the hood, doors, wing, seats, wheel tubs, and engine diaper. Finishing out the show-quality look, Saboury had the car finished in House of Kolor Brandywine over a silver base with candy neon graphics and marble accents. The grille and other details have been hand-painted, and the interior is done up to match the exterior. 

It certainly won’t fetch the kind of cash that the all-original first-gens will, but one way or the other, Saboury’s car is getting a new owner come January. How much do you think it will sell for?