With the increasing love affair for pro-touring cars, it leaves behind the question of what happened to the pro-street cars? There is nothing wrong with the convenience and modern refinements of a LS engine in classic Corvette that could be driven cross-country; but seriously, what happened to the semi street driven drag strip shredding pro-street cars of years ago? Recently one these increasingly forgotten cars was caught on video at a cruise event in Ocean City, Maryland. What appears to be a candy apple red ’69 Stingray gave us hope that the pro-street movement is not dead. Again this may be a love it or hate situation with this car due to extensive modifications, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Many of project cars are treated to an original makeover, while others emerge as a reflection of what the owner thinks the car should have been. It is hard to justify the addition of “Lambo” style doors on anything other than an actual Lamborghini, especially not a classic Stingray; but this is a reflection of the owner’s personal choice and with the spectacular paint and body work on the car is not garish like many of economy cars subjected to the vertical door-movement.

This unique ’69 Stingray belongs to Jimmy Grasso and was featured in Vette magazine a while back. According to Vette, Grasso’s C3 is powered by a 432 cubic inch engine with a Brodix aluminum block and heads. Thanks to the addition of 500-horse NOS nitrous injection system and all of the supporting goodies, this ’69 puts approximately 780 horsepower to the ground. With the powerful engine and well-designed suspension this street driven Stingray has made several trips into the single digit range including a best of 9.309 at 137 MPH. Regardless of personal bias when it comes to the “Lambo” style doors, Pro Street is about creating personal vision of what a street car should be along with hauling ass.