“There’s no mistaking a Corvette for anything but a Corvette,” said the 1969 sales brochure released by Chevy. Looking at the recent find from our friends over at Cars In Barns, we would agree. Even tarp’d over, hidden in the corner of an old dingy garage, one would never mistake the Vette for anything but a Vette.

Upon the discovery of this ’69 Corvette Roadster, the current owner fell in love. Once uncovered it was found that the original keys were still in the ignition. In need of a home and orphaned by the passing of the previous owner, this unique find was quickly acquired. An outstanding find for any Vette enthusiast.

With the release of the ‘69 Corvette, the “Stingray” badge was brought back, although it was now one word. The new 1969 Vette was refined with changes that increased horsepower as well as fixed small things that annoyed customers.

The big news of the day was the coupe outsold the convertible for the first time and continued to do so in the years following. Engine choices were changed with a new 350 ci V8 replacing the previous 327. Corvette big-blocks again began with the base 390 hp and ranged up to the 425 hp 427. This would be the last year of the 427 cubic inch big block engine.

By all appearances, this garage find was overall in pretty good condition when the new owner picked it up. However, with only 69,000 miles, it was found to have a blown 427 engine and had not hit the pavement since 1975. But as with any project rebuild, a little blood, sweat, and tears will reap everlasting rewards.

The third-generation Corvette was met with decidedly mixed reviews, however still managed to sell exceptionally well, with the 1969 producing even better results. Total production jumped to 38,762, a 35.69 percent rise and the first time production had topped 30,000. This number would not be exceeded for nearly a decade after.

A 1969 Corvette Roadster, as it appears in its original appearance

With the power of the internet, these rare garage and barn finds are found at the click of the mouse. For those with a unique find looking to show off a new project or possibly in search of the next project, Cars In Barns is a great site for either. Someone’s forgotten dust-collector could become someone’s dream come true. What is your dream find?