Upgrading a late model Corvette with a supercharger isn’t an inexpensive proposition, so it’s not surprising that most owners contemplating the job do a lot of research first. If you’re dropping a couple grand on a blower kit, you want to know what to expect for your hard-earned cash. Fortunately, the interwebs make doing this kind of homework far easier, and dare we say, fun.

A case in point is the Edelbrock E-FORCE supercharger for the C6 Corvette. Based around the Eaton Gen VI 2300 TVS® Supercharger rotating assembly, they’re straightforward to install, fit under the stock hood, and their advanced design makes power without putting a lot of unnecessary stress and heat into your LS. Edelbrock claims 550-plus crank horsepower and 515 pound-feet of torque for both their LS2 and LS3 street legal superchargers (just under 600 is possible with the optional fuel pump upgrade) and an incredible 657 horsepower and 582 pound feet at the crank for LS7-powered C6 Z06′s. But, horsepower at the crank isn’t a particularly useful number, since it has to make its way to the tires before it does you any good. So, what do E-FORCE equipped C6′s make on a chassis dyno?

Total Performance Solutions (TPS) Motorsports of Campbell, California, can answer that question with authority – their YouTube channel has dozens of different dyno pull videos available for your viewing pleasure, including four C6 Corvettes that have gotten a little boost from the Edelbrock E-FORCE. Let’s see what these cars actually put to the pavement…

First up is an ex-Hertz ZHZ rent-a-Vette, and not just any ZHZ either – this is SN 001! This automatic-tranny convertible does 483 horsepower and 425 pound-feet to the Dynojet 224x roller. Factoring in a 15% drivetrain loss, the “555 Horsepower” graphics on the side of the Corvette are right on the money for power at the crank.

Next, we have a 2011 Grand Sport that did 389 horsepower and 386 pound-feet to the wheels before being blown; right on the money for a car with a 430 horsepower rating “at the brochure” and 11%-12% drivetrain friction losses. We see in the video that this car is getting the upgraded fuel pump as part of the installation, and once it’s all ready to go, the E-FORCE bumps the numbers up to 497 horsepower and 478 pound feet on the DynoJet. That 497 where the rubber meets the road works out to 556 crank horsepower – again, right where it should be for 91 octane and 8 pounds of boost.

At this point, you might be asking yourself, “but what about Corvettes that already have some tweaks?” The next Corvette in our TPS batting order is another 2011 GS, but though we don’t get a “before” number, we suspect pre-existing work thanks to the fact that this Corvette ends up doing 521 horsepower and 484 pound-feet to the pavement on the same 91 octane gas and 8 PSI we saw in the previous video.

Finally, the one you’ve been waiting for – a 2007 C6 Z06! Will the E-FORCE supercharger for the LS7 perform as advertised like the LS3 version does? The final numbers are 572 horsepower and 520 pound-feet, the calculated equivalent of 657 horsepower at the crank with a 15% drivetrain loss. Yes, we know you scrolled up to look at what Edelbrock claimed…

So there you have it. Four different Corvettes, all run on the same chassis dyno, and all putting down power as advertised. We’d say that’s a pretty good endorsement for the Edelbrock E-FORCE supercharger system, wouldn’t you?