The C7 Corvette is damn near a “bespoke” car these days. Webster defines “bespoke” as “commissioned to a particular specification. It may be altered or tailored to the customs, tastes, or usage of an individual purchaser.”

What was once the domain of fussy high-end  sports cars from Europe is now available to every Corvette buyer. If you haven’t looked at the Corvette website lately, you owe it to yourself to wade in and see just how finely tuned you can tailor a Corvette build.

The possibilities are essentially endless. From interior thread colors and material choices, to seemingly endless color options for hash stripes, body vents, spoilers, tail lights, brake calipers and emblems.

It’s a tad overwhelming and we’d recommend anyone interested in purchasing a new ‘Vette to really take time to digest the options Chevy has available. A sharp salesperson would be an asset here as they could lead you through the ordering process.

Another way to make sense of all the combinations available is to really take notice of a ‘Vette you see at a dealership, in a parking lot or a car show and mimic those parameters when ordering.

As GM Authority reports, General Motors just invested $44 million in Bowling Green and the result is now the most configurable Corvette in history and takes “bespoke” to the next with installing essentially a custom engine in every Z06 it builds.

As of May 1st, 2016, all LT4 V8 production has been moved in house to Bowling Green Final Assembly and each one is hand assembled by one technician. Chevy will produce 45 LT4s a day with each technician responsible for 2.5 mills a day. You can even build it your self for a mere $5,000.

So anyone who can afford the price of admission to Corvette ownership can build a custom car, straight from the factory.

These are the good old days.