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Corvette “Field Find” May Have Interesting History

In the Corvette world, there’s so much emphasis on factory stock condition, provenance, and Bloomington Gold credibility that seeing a modified older Vette is somewhat of an anomaly. And when you see a modified Corvette, it’s usually a C2 with triple taillights and the bumpers removed.

So this recent C1 find is neat not only because it’s different from the same-old same-old, but it’s also a “field find.” Here’s the story on this ’57 drag car courtesy of Barn Finds.

1957 was perhaps the most significant year for the Corvette since its introduction. With an improved small block growing to 283 cubic inches, it was now available with fuel injection in two versions, the top one putting out 283 horsepower. In advertising, it was touted as achieving the magical one horsepower per cubic inch, although it wasn’t the first.

Dig the Jag in the background. Without that car, the Corvette likely wouldn't exist.

According to Barn Finds, a friend of Mike C.’s found this ’57 in a field in an undisclosed state. This car’s history is not known, but there are a few clues. Based on the markings on the side, the Vette was a NHRA racer in the 1960s; the BM/SP class was for modified sports cars having an engine size/weight ratio of 7.5 to 9.99 pounds per cubic inch. Another clue are the names Martin & Hulford, likely the team that raced it.

An extensive restoration is needed, but if the history of the Vette is discovered, this could make for a really neat authentic, nostalgic racer.

Mike and his friend would like to learn more about its history so they can give it a proper restoration. How was it modified? How was it equipped originally? Was it campaigned successfully? Did it set any records? Reading the feedback in the comments section, a gentleman claims that he once owned the car and it raced in Missouri:

I owned this car from 1965-68. Originally (on the drag strip) the hood was sheetmetal over a conduit frame. The car was maroon and belonged to a Nixa, MO barber. I sold the car to Darrell Stineman (sp?) in 1968. I have some photos of it on the strip and in the World of Wheels. I am the one who painted it orange. It ran a 283 in ’65, a 327 in ’64 and again in 1967-8. If this car is not too far from MO where it was built, unless there were 2 of them . . . which, by the way, DOES happen! Someone sees the car and replicates the design elsewhere.

Another enthusiast responded:

Great car & very exciting. I have access to the TRUE story of this car. Send me a PM at and I will put you in touch with the correct person [Mr. Hulford].

Ain’t the Internet great?



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